Commit f434d191 authored by Ondřej Zajíček's avatar Ondřej Zajíček
Browse files

Documentation updates

parent e755986a
......@@ -206,6 +206,7 @@ protocol device {
protocol rip {
export all;
import all;
interface "*";
}
</code>
......@@ -298,19 +299,88 @@ to zero to disable it. An empty <cf><m/switch/</cf> is equivalent to <cf/on/
<p>There are several options that give sense only with certain protocols:
<descrip>
<tag>passwords { password "<m/password/" from <m/time/ to <m/time/ passive <m/time/ id
<m/num/ [...] }</tag> Specifies passwords to be used with this protocol. <cf>Passive <m/time/</cf> is
time from which the password is not used for sending, but it is recognized on reception. <cf/id/ is password ID as needed by
certain protocols. Format of <cf><m/time/</cf> is <tt>dd-mm-yyyy HH:MM:SS</tt>.
<tag>interface "<m/mask/"|<m/prefix/ [ { <m/option/ ; [...] } ]</tag> Specifies which
interfaces is this protocol active on and allows you to set options on a
per-interface basis. Mask is specified as in shell-like patterns, thus <cf>interface
"*" { mode broadcast; };</cf> will start the protocol on all interfaces with <cf>mode
broadcast;</cf> option. If the first character of mask is <cf/-/, such interfaces are
excluded. Masks are parsed left-to-right, thus <cf/interface "-eth*", "*";/ means all but
the ethernets. Default: none.
<tag><label id="dsc-iface">interface [-] [ "<m/mask/" ] [ <m/prefix/ ] [, ...] [ { <m/option/ ; [...] } ]</tag>
Specifies a set of interfaces on which the protocol is activated with
given interface-specific options. A set of interfaces specified by one
interface option is described using an interface pattern. The
interface pattern consists of a sequence of clauses (separted by
commas), each clause may contain a mask, a prefix, or both of them. An
interface matches the clause if its name matches the mask (if
specified) and its address matches the prefix (if specified). Mask is
specified as shell-like pattern.
An interface matches the pattern if it matches any of its
clauses. If the clause begins with <cf/-/, matching interfaces are
excluded. Patterns are parsed left-to-right, thus
<cf/interface "eth0", -"eth*", "*";/ means eth0 and all
non-ethernets.
An interface option can be used more times with different
interfaces-specific options, in that case for given interface
the first matching interface option is used.
This option is allowed in Direct, OSPF and RIP protocols,
but in OSPF protocol it is used in <cf/area/ subsection.
Default: none.
Examples:
<cf>interface "*" { type broadcast; };</cf> - start the protocol on all interfaces with
<cf>type broadcast</cf> option.
<cf>interface "eth1", "eth4", "eth5" { type pointopoint; };</cf> - start the protocol
on enumerated interfaces with <cf>type pointopoint</cf> option.
<cf>interface -192.168.1.0/24, 192.168.0.0/16;</cf> - start the protocol on all
interfaces that have address from 192.168.0.0/16, but not
from 192.168.1.0/24.
<cf>interface -192.168.1.0/24, 192.168.0.0/16;</cf> - start the protocol on all
interfaces that have address from 192.168.0.0/16, but not
from 192.168.1.0/24.
<cf>interface "eth*" 192.168.1.0/24;</cf> - start the protocol on all
ethernet interfaces that have address from 192.168.1.0/24.
<tag><label id="dsc-pass">password "<m/password/" [ { id <m/num/; generate from <m/time/; generate to <m/time/; accept from <m/time/; accept to <m/time/; } ]</tag>
Specifies a password that can be used by the protocol. Password option can
be used more times to specify more passwords. If more passwords are
specified, it is a protocol-dependent decision which one is really
used. Specifying passwords does not mean that authentication is
enabled, authentication can be enabled by separate, protocol-dependent
<cf/authentication/ option.
This option is allowed in OSPF and RIP protocols. BGP has also
<cf/password/ option, but it is slightly different and described
separately.
Default: none.
</descrip>
<p>Password option can contain section with some (not necessary all) password sub-options:
<descrip>
<tag>id <M>num</M></tag>
ID of the password, (0-255). If it's not used, BIRD will choose
ID based on an order of the password item in the interface. For
example, second password item in one interface will have default
ID 2. ID is used by some routing protocols to identify which
password was used to authenticate protocol packets.
<tag>generate from "<m/time/"</tag>
The start time of the usage of the password for packet signing.
The format of <cf><m/time/</cf> is <tt>dd-mm-yyyy HH:MM:SS</tt>.
<tag>generate to "<m/time/"</tag>
The last time of the usage of the password for packet signing.
<tag>accept from "<m/time/"</tag>
The start time of the usage of the password for packet verification.
<tag>accept to "<m/time/"</tag>
The last time of the usage of the password for packet verification.
</descrip>
<chapt>Remote control
......@@ -327,6 +397,9 @@ codes along with the messages. You do not necessarily need to use <file/birdc/ t
own applications could do that, too -- the format of communication between
BIRD and <file/birdc/ is stable (see the programmer's documentation).
Many commands have the <m/name/ of the protocol instance as an argument.
This argument can be omitted if there exists only a single instance.
<p>Here is a brief list of supported functions:
<descrip>
......@@ -339,12 +412,23 @@ BIRD and <file/birdc/ is stable (see the programmer's documentation).
<tag>show protocols [all]</tag>
Show list of protocol instances along with tables they are connected to and protocol status, possibly giving verbose information, if <cf/all/ is specified.
<tag>show ospf [interface|neighbors] [<m/name/] ["<m/interface/"]</tag>
Show detailed information about OSPF protocol, possibly giving a verbose list of interfaces and neighbors. The <m/name/ of the protocol instance can be omitted if there exists only a single instance.
<tag>show ospf interface [<m/name/] ["<m/interface/"]</tag>
Show detailed information about OSPF interfaces.
<tag>show ospf neighbors [<m/name/] ["<m/interface/"]</tag>
Show a list of OSPF neighbors and a state of adjacency to them.
<tag>show ospf state [<m/name/]</tag>
Show detailed information about OSPF areas based on a content of link-state database.
It shows network topology, aggregated networks and routers from other areas and external routes.
<tag>show ospf topology [<m/name/]</tag>
Show a topology of OSPF areas based on a content of link-state database.
It is just a stripped-down version of 'show ospf state'.
<tag>show static [<m/name/]</tag>
Show detailed information about static routes. The <m/name/ of the protocol instance can be omitted if there exists only a single instance.
Show detailed information about static routes.
<tag>show interfaces [summary]</tag>
Show the list of interfaces. For each interface, print its type, state, MTU and addresses assigned.
......@@ -367,7 +451,7 @@ BIRD and <file/birdc/ is stable (see the programmer's documentation).
a given filter (<cf>filter <m/name/</cf> or <cf>filter { <m/filter/ }
</cf> or matching a given condition (<cf>where <m/condition/</cf>).
The <cf/import/ and <cf/preimport/ switches ask for printing of entries
that are imported to the specified protocol. With <cf/preimport/, the
that are imported to the specified protocol. With <cf/preimport/, the
import filter of the protocol is skipped.
<p>The <cf/stats/ switch requests showing of route statistics (the
......@@ -1172,6 +1256,7 @@ protocol ospf &lt;name&gt; {
<tag>interface <M>pattern</M></tag>
Defines that the specified interfaces belong to the area being defined.
See <ref id="dsc-iface" name="interface"> common option for detailed description.
<tag>virtual link <M>id</M></tag>
Virtual link to router with the router id. Virtual link acts as a
......@@ -1257,24 +1342,7 @@ protocol ospf &lt;name&gt; {
<tag>password "<M>text</M>"</tag>
An 8-byte or 16-byte password used for authentication.
<tag>id <M>num</M></tag>
ID of the password, (0-255). If it's not used, BIRD will choose
ID based on an order of the password item in the interface. For
example, second password item in one interface will have default
ID 2.
<tag>generate from <M>date</M></tag>
The start time of the usage of the password for packet signing.
<tag>generate to <M>date</M></tag>
The last time of the usage of the password for packet signing.
<tag>accept from <M>date</M></tag>
The start time of the usage of the password for packet verification.
<tag>accept to <M>date</M></tag>
The last time of the usage of the password for packet verification.
See <ref id="dsc-pass" name="password"> common option for detailed description.
<tag>neighbors { <m/set/ } </tag>
A set of neighbors to which Hello messages on nonbroadcast networks
......@@ -1310,7 +1378,7 @@ protocol ospf MyOSPF {
accept;
}
reject;
};
};
area 0.0.0.0 {
interface "eth*" {
cost 11;
......@@ -1323,17 +1391,15 @@ protocol ospf MyOSPF {
interface "ppp*" {
cost 100;
authentication cryptographic;
passwords {
password "abc" {
id 1;
generate to "22-04-2003 11:00:06";
accept from "17-01-2001 12:01:05";
};
password "def" {
id 2;
generate to "22-07-2005 17:03:21";
accept from "22-02-2001 11:34:06";
};
password "abc" {
id 1;
generate to "22-04-2003 11:00:06";
accept from "17-01-2001 12:01:05";
};
password "def" {
id 2;
generate to "22-07-2005 17:03:21";
accept from "22-02-2001 11:34:06";
};
};
interface "arc0" {
......@@ -1497,7 +1563,7 @@ because there are no good implementations of OSPFv3.
<tag/authentication none|plaintext|md5/ selects authentication method to be used. <cf/none/ means that
packets are not authenticated at all, <cf/plaintext/ means that a plaintext password is embedded
into each packet, and <cf/md5/ means that packets are authenticated using a MD5 cryptographic
hash. If you set authentication to not-none, it is a good idea to add <cf>passwords { }</cf>
hash. If you set authentication to not-none, it is a good idea to add <cf>password</cf>
section. Default: none.
<tag>honor always|neighbor|never </tag>specifies when should requests for dumping routing table
......@@ -1562,8 +1628,8 @@ protocol rip MyRIP_test {
port 1520;
period 10;
garbage time 60;
interface "eth0" { metric 3; mode multicast; }
"eth1" { metric 2; mode broadcast; };
interface "eth0" { metric 3; mode multicast; };
interface "eth*" { metric 2; mode broadcast; };
honor neighbor;
authentication none;
import filter { print "importing"; accept; };
......
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